Architects of Atrocity: The Sudanese Government’s War Crimes, Crimes against Humanity, and Torture in South Kordofan and Blue Nile States

Architects of Atrocity

Over the past two years, the Enough Project and the Satellite Sentinel Project, or SSP, have used DigitalGlobe satellite imagery and on-the-ground research to gather information that could serve as evidence of the Sudanese government’s responsibility for war crimes and crimes against humanity in its South Kordofan and Blue Nile states. The level and extent of evidence set out in our reports supports referring the situation in Sudan’s two southern states to the International Criminal Court, or ICC, for further investigation and prosecution.

(Imagery) Architects of Atrocity: The Sudanese Government’s War Crimes, Crimes against Humanity, and Torture in South Kordofan and Blue Nile States

Architects of Atrocity Imagery

View or download the imagery on Flickr.

A new legal analysis by the Enough Project and its Satellite Sentinel Project, or SSP, finds compelling evidence that since June 2011, the government of Sudan has committed war crimes, crimes against humanity, and torture in Sudan's South Kordofan and Blue Nile States.

Two years of eyewitness reports, photos, videos, and satellite imagery -- analyzed by the DigitalGlobe Analysis Center and informed by the Enough Project's sources on the ground, field research, and legal analysis -- present a strong dossier of evidence for referral to the International Criminal Court and to the United Nations.

Fixing the Broken Approach to Peace Between the Sudans

Posted by Carrie Beason

Earlier this week, UN Interim Security Force for Abyei, or UNISFA, completed the first verification mission to confirm troop withdrawal on both sides of the highly disputed 14-mile area. While this success is reason for cautious optimism in the peace process between Sudan and South Sudan, a new Enough Project policy paper presents critical contextual perspective on the ongoing cycle of progress and setback that has become typical of peace negotiations between Sudan and South Sudan.

Wired UK Magazine Profiles Satellite Sentinel Project

Satellite Imagery from Wired UK Magazine

Situation Report: Sudan Armed Forces Buildup in Heglig (Imagery)

tanks and HETS at Heglig

View or download the imagery on Flickr.

New satellite imagery, analyzed for the Satellite Sentinel Project. or SSP, by DigitalGlobe’s Analysis Center, shows 10 newly-arrived main battle tanks, 10 heavy transporters (HETS), and two Mi-24 helicopter gunships, in the oil-producing Sudanese border town of Heglig, South Kordofan. This recent increase in activity brings the total tanks in the greater Heglig area to 22, which is the equivalent of two tank companies.

View or download the imagery on Flickr.

Satellite Imagery Confirms Sudan Armed Forces Buildup at Border Hotspot

WASHINGTON -- Satellite imagery from March 5, 2013, analyzed for the Satellite Sentinel Project, or SSP, by DigitalGlobe’s Analysis Center, shows newly-arrived main battle tanks, 10 heavy transporters (HETS), and two Mi-24 helicopter gunships, in Heglig, an oil producing region in South Kordofan, Sudan, which South Sudan claims lies within its territory. Heglig was the scene of the last major military engagement between Sudan and South Sudan in April 2012. 

Sudan Armed Forces Buildup in Heglig: Situation Report

Map of Current Disposition of SAF

Analysis of DigitalGlobe imagery from an oil-producing area on the border between Sudan and South Sudan, dated March 5, 2013, indicates an increase in Sudan Armed Forces, or SAF, including the arrival of additional tanks and two Mi-24 helicopter gunships. The imagery is of a SAF position at Heglig, a region in South Kordofan, Sudan, which South Sudan claims lies within its territory.

South Sudan "Eye Radio" Promotes Message of Peace and Stability

In attempts to stem the violence and urge unity and common vision forged among those of South Sudan, Eye Radio station has begun to air several messages stressing the goal of “peace, stability, and prosperity” for South Sudan.

Syndicate content