Our Reports

February 09, 2011

On November 11 and 12, 2010, the village of Kiir Adem in northern Bahr el Ghazal State was reportedly attacked by SAF planes--both MiG fighters and Antonov transport planes--wounding seven SPLA troops and five civilians.  Less than two weeks later, fighter jets allegedly returned for another two-day aerial bombardment that left four SPLA troops wounded. The SPLA moved three anti-aircraft guns to the area, though spokesmen for the southern army told the Associated Press that they would resist responding to alleged attacks by the SAF. (Fick, M.

February 09, 2011

Hundreds of armed riot police used batons and teargas to break up students and other young Sudanese protesters calling for the resignation of leaders of the Sudanese government.  Witnesses reported that police beat and arrested an unconfirmed number of students in an effort to contain demonstrations to universities in the capital city.  Anti-government protesters organized in part through the use of social networking sites, including Facebook, which plays host to groups called "The Spark" and "Youth for Change", which has attracted over 15,000 members.

February 09, 2011

Small Arms Survey received reports that some 4,000 - 6,000 Misseriya supporting the north Sudanese-affiliated Popular Defense Force militia, or PDF, were gathering near Kharassana, north of Abyei Town as of October, 2010.

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February 09, 2011

An unknown number of students engaging in anti-government protests in Kassala were reportedly beaten back by riot police.  Kassala was one of several locations across the country, including Khartoum, El-Obeid and Omdurman, that saw similar demonstrations inspired by the recent popular uprisings in Egypt and Tunisia.  (McDoom, Opheera. "Sudanese Student Dies After Protest - Activists." Reuters 31 Jan. 2011. Retrieved from http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/01/31/uk-sudan-protests-idUKTRE70U21...)

February 09, 2011

Approximately 500 protesters staged an anti-government demonstration in the market area of El-Obeid, the capital of North Kordofan state.  Witnesses reported that riot police used tear gas to disperse the group, who appear to have been inspired by the popular revolts in Egypt and Tunisia.  "Sudan Police Clash With Protesters." Al Jazeera. 30 Jan. 2011.  Retrieved from http://english.aljazeera.net/news/africa/2011/01/2011130131451294670.html

February 09, 2011

On January 17, a ministerial meeting between northern and southern representatives took place in Kadugli to formalize resolutions to security issues initially discussed by Misseriya and Dinka Ngok leaders on January 13.  Southern Interior Minister Giir and Abyei Chief Administrator Deng Arop represented the south, while the north was represented by Interior Minister Hamed and Governor of Southern Kordofan, Ahmed Haroun. The following points were agreed upon in the meeting: 1) The SPLA must remove its police from the northern Abyei area. They will be replaced by two JIUs from Wau.

February 09, 2011

A convoy of buses and trailers carrying returnees traveling south to vote in the referendum was reportedly ambushed by Misseriya tribesmen in the village of Siteib, roughly 80km north west of Abyei, on the north side of the north-south border, between Aweil in Northern Bahr el Ghazal State and Dabak in Southern Kordofan State. Reports indicated that 10 people were killed, 18 wounded.  The original number of vehicles in the convoy remains unconfirmed, though 22 buses and the known survivors were reportedly taken to Dilling in South Kordofan State.

February 09, 2011

Reports from the region indicate that the Sudan Armed Forces believes that Sudan People's Liberation Army has crossed the Contested Border Line near El Halluf.  The SAF have reportedly reinforced their presence in the area with a battalion from Abu Jebeihah, the headquarters of the 53rd Brigade of the SAF. (Confidential Source)

January 16, 2011

Southern Kordofan electoral official resigns over voter registration deadlock: crowd-sourced information from Sudan Vote Monitor.

January 12, 2011

KAKUMA, Kenya– With their country at war far more often than at peace in the 54 years since independence, Sudan’s people have often been on the move in search of security. For the southerners living in Kakuma refugee camp in Kenya, this week’s referendum on independence represents the best chance for returning to their homeland, and they are turning out in droves.

Of the 8,000 to 9,000 southerners living in Kakuma, the Southern Sudan Referendum Commission registered 5,525 voters.