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Fatal Impact: Plane Crash of Sudan's Delegation to Talodi, South Kordofan, Sudan (Report)

Fatal Impact Cover

For the past two years, the Government of Sudan, or GoS, has sent delegations of senior officials, including military and security leaders, accompanied by state media crews, to Sudan Armed Forces, or SAF, bases in border areas during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan.

On August 19, 2012, on the Muslim holiday of Eid al-Fitr, which marks the last day of Ramadan, a GoS delegation chartered a plane which took off from Khartoum and crashed on approach to the SAF airstrip in Talodi, South Kordofan. The Talodi delegation was one of four delegations, which the GoS dispatched to hotspots of rebellion during Ramadan 2012. The other three went to SAF bases in El Fasher, North Darfur1; Kadugli, South Kordofan; and Kurmuk, Blue Nile state.

Satellite Sentinel Project Releases Report on Plane Crash of Sudan’s Delegation to Talodi

WASHINGTON -- For the past two years, the Government of Sudan, or GoS, has sent delegations of senior officials, including military and security leaders, accompanied by state media crews, to Sudan Armed Forces, or SAF, bases in border areas during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan.

On August 19, 2012, on the Muslim holiday of Eid al-Fitr, which marks the last day of Ramadan, a GoS delegation chartered a plane which took off from Khartoum and crashed on approach to the SAF airstrip in Talodi, South Kordofan. The Talodi delegation was one of four delegations, which the GoS dispatched to hotspots of rebellion during Ramadan 2012. The other three went to SAF bases in El Fasher, North Darfur; Kadugli, South Kordofan; and Kurmuk, Blue Nile state.

SitRep: Disposition of Aircraft at El Obeid Airbase, El Obeid, Sudan

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This Situation Report shows Sudan Armed Forces, or SAF, aircraft at El Obeid Airfield in North Kordofan state, Sudan. El Obeid is within striking range of the Nuba Mountains region of South Kordofan state, as well as refugee across the border in South Sudan.

Enough Policy Brief: The Case for Conditioning International Financial Support to Sudan

Posted by Jenn Christian

The U.S. government recently announced that it will lobby international donors to pledge financial support for Sudan. The release of any funds that these efforts yield should, however, be condition so as to incentivize the government of Sudan to cease ongoing human rights abuses.

Sudan Brief: Have the Tripartite Partners Secured Humanitarian Relief for South Kordofan and Blue Nile?

Posted by Alistair Dawson

Today, the Enough Project released its latest policy brief that discusses the implications of the government of Sudan and the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement-North, or SPLM-N, signing separate memoranda of understanding, or MOUs, with the Tripartite Partners—comprised of the U.N., African Union, and League of Arab States.

Sudan, South Sudan Strike Deal on Oil

JUBA, South Sudan – Two major breakthroughs marked the last days of negotiations in Addis Ababa between South Sudan and Sudan, and between Sudan and the rebelling Sudan People’s Liberation Movement-North. The agreements—one on financial arrangements between the North and South, and a second that secured humanitarian access into the conflict zones of South Kordofan and Blue Nile—followed on Khartoum’s decision to assume more conciliatory postures on both issues.

Washington Post Oped: Keeping Sudan from Becoming Another Syria

Posted by John Prendergast. This oped co-authored with author Dave Eggers originally appeared in The Washington Post.

Enough Project: Sudan Fails to Comply with Nine Provisions of U.N. Security Council Resolution

Enough Project Media Advisory

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Thursday, August 2, 2012

Contact: Jonathan Hutson, +1 202.386.1618jhutson@enoughproject.org

United Nations Security Council Resolution 2046 Compliance Tracker: Summary Chart

UNSC Compliance Tracker

The following chart is designed to summarize the Enough Project’s United Nations Security Council Resolution 2046 Compliance Tracker. The chart identifies the government of Sudan, the government of South Sudan, and the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement-North’s respective compliance, or lack thereof, with the provisions of U.N. Security Council Resolution 2046. Notably, the chart is not designed to comprehensively catalogue the actions that each party has taken since May 2, 2012 related to Resolution 2046; rather, the chart summarizes each respective party’s compliance to date. The information contained in the chart is based on information publicly available at the time of publication.

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